Statement on NYC Mayor de Blasio’s “Hip-Hop” Street Namings

NYC Hip Hop Street Naming

STATEMENT ON NEW YORK CITY COUNCIL STREET NAMINGS HONORING DJ KOOL HERC & HIP-HOP MUSIC AND CULTURE AND ROBERT “PH” DIAZ

The Center for Hip-Hop Advocacy Executive Director Manny Faces issued the following statement on Friday, February 26, 2016:

“We commend the New York City Council and Mayor Bill de Blasio for naming streets in honor of hip-hop music and culture, and the late hip-hop recording artist Robert “PH” Diaz, respectively.

Recognizing the Bronx block that houses 1520 Sedgwick Avenue as “Hip Hop Boulevard” demonstrates reverence and hometown pride for the artistic and cultural phenomenon that DJ Kool Herc, Cindy Campbell, the building and surrounding neighborhood helped create.

Similarly, the naming of DeGraw Street between Fourth and Fifth Avenues in Park Slope, Brooklyn to honor Robert “PH” Diaz, demonstrates a keen understanding that members of New York’s hip-hop artistic community can touch many lives in positive ways, and, as in Diaz’s case, are indeed worthy of tribute. We salute City Council members and the Mayor for honoring the wishes of Diaz’s family, friends and fans.

Hip-hop delivers significant artistic and cultural contributions throughout the city, nation and world in areas including music, the arts, fashion, commerce and education, and we applaud New York City for recognizing and celebrating its historical and continuing importance.”

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The mission of The Center for Hip-Hop Advocacy is to broaden public perception of hip-hop music and culture, ensuring that varied and continuing contributions to multiple fields and disciplines are fairly and accurately documented and communicated. The Center focuses on highlighting hip-hop’s contributions in areas including, but not limited to, music and the arts, education, activism/politics/community, health/sciences/well-being and philosophy. In simplest terms, we exist to help tell hip-hop’s complete story, past, present and future, from an independent perspective, to inform, educate and inspire while protecting and promoting the cultural, artistic and community-based aspects of hip-hop as a whole.